Software engineer. Hedonist. Vegetarian. Fiancé of the amazing Cass.

 

William Gibson - Neuromancer
Neuromancer contains the most graceless sentence I have ever read:

He lay on his side and watched her breathe, her breasts, the sweep of a flank defined with the functional elegance of a war plane’s fuselage.

Seriously! In spite of the author’s shortcomings though it’s also full of maker culture, continues the fatale image that helped make the 90s so wonderful, and inspired some truly great work like Snow Crash and A Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer.
I was adamantly recommended the book by a colleague until I surrendered, realising that I need not lament the many things I missed out on while growing up because the world is patient. The clumsy prose made for a pretty tiring read and any novel ideas have long since eventuated or been plaguarised so I abandoned it two-thirds of the way through, but nonetheless I’m grateful for the state of mind it revitalised.
The novel shows its age through its obsession with technical minutia. If this is the future then technology should be indistinguishable from magic; even today only the nerdiest of people care about hardware specifications instead of thinking in terms of capabilities.
For me the most fascinating concept was the protagonist being punished with surgical modification that banned him from the internet. I look forward to seeing this idea again.

William Gibson - Neuromancer

Neuromancer contains the most graceless sentence I have ever read:

He lay on his side and watched her breathe, her breasts, the sweep of a flank defined with the functional elegance of a war plane’s fuselage.

Seriously! In spite of the author’s shortcomings though it’s also full of maker culture, continues the fatale image that helped make the 90s so wonderful, and inspired some truly great work like Snow Crash and A Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer.

I was adamantly recommended the book by a colleague until I surrendered, realising that I need not lament the many things I missed out on while growing up because the world is patient. The clumsy prose made for a pretty tiring read and any novel ideas have long since eventuated or been plaguarised so I abandoned it two-thirds of the way through, but nonetheless I’m grateful for the state of mind it revitalised.

The novel shows its age through its obsession with technical minutia. If this is the future then technology should be indistinguishable from magic; even today only the nerdiest of people care about hardware specifications instead of thinking in terms of capabilities.

For me the most fascinating concept was the protagonist being punished with surgical modification that banned him from the internet. I look forward to seeing this idea again.

Mark Z. Danielewski - House of Leaves

I love reflowable books more than I ever did the paper brick kind. They are always with you, weigh nothing and require no care. I chose this to be possibly the last printed novel I’ll read.

House of Leaves is ergodic, simulating the flow of time and space through page layouts and recursive footnoting that at times needed four or five fingers between different pages, something I haven’t done since Appointment with F.E.A.R.. It’s a film, essay and novel, horror, romance and biography, masquerading as non-fiction that activates many areas of your brain all at once.

I’ve read my copy across five different countries, adding my experiences and contexts to the memories of the imagery that it conjured. It’s overwhelming just thinking about it all.